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As with any franchise, uniformity is a key asset. A customer who buys from one shop has a right to expect, and deserves, a similar item and standard at another. An irritation to some owners perhaps but hey, this also makes sure that the brand itself grows in the right manner. If your own shop is clean, neat and delivers on our promise, you have no need to fear the rules and standards. These are here to police the franchisee who is not delivering on our promise.

Coffee, coffee brew, chicken mayonnaise and assorted curries are the only recipes which we ask you to comply with now.

Coffee, we will do this on site…here are the others

This recipe is used for a chicken wrap (with added lettuce, dressing, feta cheese and fresh tomato); as fresh or toasted sandwich (cut into four upright (crust down) triangles to-sit or two larger triangles as a take away in a paper bag. The to-sit version (as with all toasted sandwiches) is to be accompanied at no additional cost by a very small mini-salad (lettuce; tomato and thinly sliced onion) as plate decoration. An optional extra would be a side order (half the normal version) of crispy french fries (thin chips).

Use ONLY: Cross & Blackwell ‘real mayonnaise’ (not Nola or diet/other options) and our own in-house spice. This may be used according to the recipe below or you might add more of the spice to taste. The spice contains a mix and there is no need to add any other spice/additive.

Chicken mayonnaise - a world favourite

Ingredients: 1 kg boneless chicken breasts, boiled until tender, allowed to cool and shred (note that the chef may also elect to roast or slow fry the chicken breasts); 300 ml mayonnaise; two tablespoons (finely chopped) fresh chives or if chives are not available, one tablespoon finely chopped spring onions; one medium sized, finely chopped normal onion; one tablespoon Freshly Roasted chicken spice. Note: The spice already contains the basics along with a hint of paprika and celery salt, do not add other spices.

Method: Mix the shredded chicken well with all the ingredients. Add more mayonnaise and spice to taste, ensuring that neither overpower the dish. The texture should be moist and firm without being too dry or sloppy. Too sloppy will mean the mixture escapes when being toasted and too dry means a poorly prepared dish.

Storage: The dish keeps well when refrigerated. Ensure pre-made stocks are used within three days and that stocks are always rotated with older stocks being used first. Optional extras: The dish goes well with a side salad; cherry tomatoes; avocado; feta cheese; chips; crisps (for decorative garnish) and grated cheese as possible added extras. Serving: On white; brown or whole-wheat breads; an open sandwich on ciabatta, sour-dough or other exotic breads. Run as a special with chips and a drink as a ‘combo’ and jazz this popular dish up as deemed appropriate.

Dare to be different

Make your dish stand out a little but don’t vary from the normal too much! Eg: Adding sweet chilly or biltong is one thing, ox tongue with your chicken is another, yucch!

Ah curry! This is a universally popular dish and one which appeals to all South Africans, rich and poor alike.

Fresh spices are the golden rule.

Old spices lose or have lost their flavour. There is no substitute for quality

At Freshly Roasted we supply our members with fresh Indian spices, these are our own tried and tested recipes and made from the finest ingredients. We vacuum pack these in 100 g pouches to ensure cleanliness ness and freshness  is maintained.  

Chicken curry - used for curry-bunnies; curry dishes - to-sit or take-away.

Ingredients: 1 kg boneless chicken breasts; one medium to large onion finely sliced; four garlic gloves chopped; one tablespoon grated or chopped ginger (if fresh garlic and ginger is not available, the pre-prepared fresh supply (eg: Supermarket version) will do; two teaspoons of salt; one teaspoon ground black pepper; one and half tablespoons Freshly Roasted curry mix; two tablespoons tomato paste; one cup chicken stock; ½ tablespoon lemon zest OR one tablespoon lemon juice.

Methodology: Cube/portion the chicken into bite sized chunks and sprinkle lightly with flour. Fry this in a little oil in two or three batches in a hot pan until coloured (not cooked through) and remove. Fry the onions until translucent and then add the ginger, garlic, tomato and spices, fry at a medium heat without scorching for 1-2 minutes and then add back the chicken and the stock. Allow to simmer until cooked (approximately 20-40 minutes). During the simmering process monitor the moisture level, you’re looking for moist with a liquid (gravy) covering or +/- 20-25 % gravy, not too dry and not too moist, a balanced dish which would work well when added to rice. Add the lemon zest just before the end of the cooking process and/or the juice. Serve with a sprinkle of fresh coriander.  

Storage: All curries store well and can be frozen for later use provided that potato has not bee added. The curries also keep well when refrigerated. Ensure pre-made (refrigerated) stocks are used within three days and that stocks are always rotated with older stocks being used first. Optional extras: The dish goes well with rice (ideally basmati); vetkoek; a side salad; sambals, being finely chopped tomato, onion and fresh chilly; a banana and chutney salsa; coconut; chutney; chilly; poppadoms and roti as possible added extras. Serving: On basmati rice; on an open vetkoek. Run as a special with free side salad and a drink as a ‘combo’ and jazz this popular dish up as deemed appropriate. A curry vetkoek and chips s a take-away favourite.


Lamb or beef curry

The recipe and cooking process is identical to chicken curry save that mutton or beef stock should be used; do not use the lemon zest or lemon juice and ensure that you remove (trim) excess fat from the meat. Lastly, a lamb or beef curry is enhanced by adding two chopped tomatoes when your are half-way through frying the onions.

Caution: Cheap cuts

For obvious reasons we’re tempted to purchase the cheaper cuts of meat. The savings can however be exaggerated. Once one has removed the excess fat and some of the more obvious and offending bones, the wastage matches up for any of the perceived savings. You are probably better off buying shoulder (blad) and/or cutlets/rib/best-end  chops. You will pay only a little more when buying in bulk and the quality of your dish will be better.

Medium, hot and even hotter curries

The recipes contained here allow for a medium strength restaurant curry. One that is flavourful, with a little bight but one that will be enjoyed by most patrons.If you would like to go a little on the hotter side, add one teaspoon of cumin and one of chilli-powder to the spice list. Another option is to have a chilli-additive as one of your table condiments. Feel free to use less or more of the Freshly Roasted spice which is also a way of controlling the “heat.”

Curry beef mince - the vetkoek favourite

Ingredients: 1 kg beef mince (lean for a healthier oprion); one medium to large onion finely sliced; four garlic gloves chopped; one tablespoon grated or chopped ginger (if fresh garlic and ginger is not available, the pre-prepared fresh supply (eg: Supermarket version) will do; two teaspoons of salt; one teaspoon ground black pepper; one and half tablespoons Freshly Roasted curry mix; ½ tablespoon turmeric; two tablespoons tomato paste; one cup beef stock; two cubed potatoes (+/-2cm square); ½ tin peas.

Methodology: Heat some oil and fry the onions until translucent; add any a chopped tomato (not essential/an added ingredient) and fry. Add the garlic/ginger and feed in the other spices frying slowly and not scorching the curry mix. Stir as you fry. Add the mince, make sure you break up the junks until the mince has separated. Add the potatoes and stock. Bring back to the boil, stir and then reduce to a low heat to simmer/stir for 15-20 minutes. Add the peas and allow them to cook for five minutes.

NB: As with all curries and stews, the chef needs to monitor the moisture level during the beginning add middle of the simmer stage. The finished product needs to be able to sit atop an pile of rice; be able to hold it’s own inside a vetkoek without leaking and my personal favourite is the curried mince inside a roti…lovely stuff!


 

Roti and wraps

These can either be made in house or bought in. At our East London store we purchase our wraps at Pick ‘n Pay. They are quite tasty, convenient and fresh. Roti is a nuisance to make and we suggest these (like samoosa’s perhaps) can be sourced from a local Indian food specialist.  

Vetkoek

A South African favourite and easy to cook during quiet times. A simple bread dough will do it. They are then deep fried in a large pot or even your chip fryer. Be careful of cooking these too quickly, they will end up being golden brown on the outside and too doughy in the middle.